Bulgarian Flat Bread Recipe | EU Politics Explained by Baking Bulgarian Bread

Bulgarian Flat Bread Recipe | EU Politics Explained by Baking Bulgarian Bread


today on baking bread will be making Parlenki – a rich buttery and ancient Bulgarian flatbread. Some say it’s as old as Bulgaria itself which established its first Kingdom in the seventh century. I’m Georg Matthes and I’m a European correspondent but I also love to bake so here’s some food for thought from Bulgaria. One of Bulgaria’s oldest recipes is flat bread the ‘Porlanki’ To make them start by preparing a preliminary dough with 145 grams of water, 0.7 grams of yeast and 145 grams of plain flour and leave it to rest for a day before starting on the bread itself. Time is what lends Bulgaria’s flat bread it’s fluffiness and time is something Bulgaria has plenty of but it doesn’t have many people. Lots of Bulgarians earn their crusts abroad. Over the past 30 years Europe’s poorest country has lost 2 million inhabitants to migration. That’s a tough egg to crack. There’s no easy solution to Bulgaria’s ‘brain drain’. Now add 270 grams of plain flour and 160 grams of brown bread flour, 190 grams of yoghurt, 6 grams of sugar, 13 grams of fresh yeast and 10 grams of salt. Bread and salt these are the two key ingredients of Europe’s oldest welcoming ceremony. If you arrive on an official visit to Bulgaria’s capital Sofia, a city founded seven thousand years ago expect to find this: women and traditional garb showing their hospitality with freshly baked loaves. Knead the dough well for about fourteen minutes by hand and leave it to rest. Then split it into six pieces. Sharing is something Bulgaria’s really good at, at least amongst its oligarchs and what a lot there is to share: EU subsidies, bribes, kickbacks. The country is the most corrupt EU Member state and that drives many citizens away. Bulgaria’s Prime Minister, nicknamed Bat Man wants to reverse this trend. A former bodyguard and firefighter Boyko Borisov likes to boast about his strength in setting things straight. So press down firmly rolling from the centre to the top. Leave to rest for 30 to 40 minutes. Next step: take a griddle pan and grill the Parlenki on top buttered on both sides of course. Flip and turn them, a lettuce pattern will emerge. What you’ll see when you’re crossing the Turkish Bulgarian border: that’s right! Refugees coming to Bulgaria don’t get a welcome ceremony, quite the opposite. But if you’re a tourist bread and salt we’ll be waiting for you. On Bulgaria beaches you can sizzle like a Paulenka fresh out of the pan [Music] Thanks for watching and if you’re hungry for more bread recipes click here!