Caller: Declining Religiosity is a Problem

Caller: Declining Religiosity is a Problem


Let’s go to, let’s go to Mark from Newport.
We haven’t heard from Mark from Newport for a while. What’s going on, Mark. Right. David, thank you for taking my call.
Um, I wanted to know your opinion. I’m sure you’ve seen, I know recently there was the
Pew research study that showed the decline of religiosity city in the U S and I personally
am worried about some of the resulting societal consequences, but I wanted to know your thoughts. Uh, well would, you’d have to tell me what
consequences you’re worried about. Sure. So I guess a couple things. So according
to Pew, the same, uh, group that provided the first set of numbers is they said, for
example, religious people are overall happier. They’re overall have better health outcomes.
There was an Ohio state university study that said controlling for socioeconomic status
and race and income and age, that religious people live longer. Uh, university of Indiana
said religious folks give more to charity, which is true, again, controlling for all
of those factors. Excuse me. The Harvard medical school said that religious people suffer significantly
less mental health problems. But I guess to be clear, I am not saying that the only way
we can improve those categories is her religion. I’m saying that the decline in religion is
pulling the rug out from so much and I don’t think we’ll be able to pick up the pieces
as fast as they’re falling, if I phrase that. Okay. Why do you think that the States that have
a lower percentage of folks that are religious seem to be a better off economically in terms
of education, in terms of health outcomes, in terms of mental health? Why, why do you
think that is? Hmm. Well, I think looking between States
is actually not controlling for enough variables because you’re not accounting for like the
state level and governance. So what I, what I think controls like best isolates the variable
of religiosity is looking within specific States where you’re, you’re holding constant,
um, you know, governance, history, that sort of thing. That’s fair. Specific States which holds more, um, variables,
con constant. Um, in every metric I just gave religious people turn out better. Yeah. I’ve just not seen that data. Everything
I’m looking at has, it has at minimum failed to demonstrate that it is because of religion
that some of these differences exist. But I’ve, I’ve not even seen the data you’re citing
so I would have to look into it. But, you know, a big, big picture, I’m not worried
about it. And, uh, I, you know, when, when we look at, um, countries that are less religious
as well, you know, you could make the same argument, which is, well, the countries that
are less religious might for other reasons be doing, be, um, have happier people so to
speak or whatever the case may be. Uh, but I’ve just not seen the data that you’re citing.
So I’d like to look at it. Sure. Um, like I, I think that what you just
said is very interesting too. Like for example, um, like, like I think the obvious example
is Western Europe where religiosity is far lower than Eastern Europe and Western Europe
is much happier. But then, you know, I, I don’t think comparing like, um, England for
example, to, uh, a, the former member of the Soviet block is a great comparison, but looking
in a lot of these countries, so like for example, this is like what the Pew, the Pew data demonstrates
when they look at religious folks within specific countries are holding variables constant that
within any or most countries, um, religious folks are happier. Yeah. That was not my takeaway from the Pew
study, but it has been a little while since I looked at it. So I’ll, I’ll review the data
Mark, but a very interesting question that you’re bringing up. Yeah. This is like, I think the fifth time
you’ve accepted my call. So thank you so much. I really appreciate it. All right, Mark. Very good to hear from you.
Thank you so much. And I’m sure we will be hearing from him again. Let’s go next to our
caller from the nine, seven, three area code. Who’s calling today from nine 73. Dave sent me. Yes it is. Huh? All right. So I was just kinda curious why
you don’t hear a lot of left-wing positions being argued from a right wing perspective.
And uh, my example, and this would be something like climate change where we typically focus
on things like the science and stuff that often gets put up for debate in mainstream
media, but you never hear some like, um, a lot of our national enemies like, uh, Russia,
Iran or Venezuela, their condoms are very heavily dependent on hydrocarbons. So the
best way to attack them would be to take out their canopies. So you never hear things like
that and just kind of wondering why there’s actually a big debate about this,
um, about whether it makes sense to argue for our policy based on arguments that would
be appealing to the other side. And it’s, it’s not clear to me that it’s a good idea.
I’ve read really good, uh, arguments on both sides. One being yes, we should, even if there
are arguments in favor of a policy we want that don’t match up with our priorities, if
it’s going to influence someone else, we should still make those arguments. Um, but then there
are lots of other folks, like for example, Nathan J. Robinson who I interviewed who said
he, he said he thinks it’s a bad idea that he should be arguing for the policies we believe
are the right ones for the reasons we believe that they are the right ones. So I think first
we have to, when you’re asking why don’t we hear it more? First we have to figure out
whether it’s a good idea and it seems to be an open question at this point. At least on
many issues. Okay, good. Yeah. Do you mind if I ask one
more bumped by? Go ahead. So as long as in a wondering what the impact
the weather might be on the upcoming democratic primary with the El Nino coming up for 2020
whether or not more increment, colder weather, it could potentially impact candidates who
have less voter enthusiasm. So if someone like Joe Biden and Mikey hurt more than someone
like Bernie, well adapt it. It’s certainly conceivable,
but I would, uh, we can’t control that. And either way, if that’s going to be a factor,
it’s going to be a factor. I don’t think it’s one of the, it’s fine to speculate, but I
don’t think it’s very actionable one way or the other. Okay, great. Thank you very much. All right, appreciate the phone call. Thank
you.